Gambling With Secrets: Part 7/8 (Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange)

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This video introduces when and why the problems of modern cryptography emerged. We are introduced to the concept behind the Diffie-Hellman public key exchange – the first step towards RSA encryption.

*Sorry if you notice some content showing up twice. I had tested part of this video out, and re-did the math part based on youtube feedback.

20 COMMENTS

  1. I still can understand this and Ive tried so hard to grasp it. Watching the paint analogy and I thought I understood it but alas…..
    ….and this is probably one of the better explanations. I was fine with the first 6 videos and even got half way through this one… I'll get there one day.

  2. While it is considered 'hard' to reverse the process of finding each partner's seed number it can be done.  If you take the two messages sent (6 and 12) and take powers of each number until it repeats the position of 10 in each sequence will be the starting seed for the other person.

    I do realize as I am typing this that this would require Eve to need to know the number 10 initially, but given that information it would be easy for Eve to impersonate either person.

  3. What constitutes the generator number 3 to be efficient for the modulus 17?

    3 can only get close to 17 by multiplying it by 8, of which the remainder might be fairly long like say pi. (To my judgment.) But, is this experiment proven true by the pseudorandom-ness of this number generating itself by law of 17 clockwise?

    Given 3 an exponent mystifies this even more away from my understanding. The reason behind this is to ultimately have a long key right? (I'm sure.)

  4. Not really as the effects cancel each other out. More computational power digital computers get the easier it get to break older codes, but it also means we'll be able to calculate even larger prime numbers making new keys.

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